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LEGO Brick Labels v35

This is a very large update which reflects the continued evolution of the LEGO Brick Labels collection. It adds 77 new labels, for a total of 1340 unique parts!

Version 35 adds 77 new labels.

Version 35 adds 77 new labels.

  1. Labels for the new Powered Up hubs, motors, & sensors.
  2. More options for sorting Minifigure parts and accessories.
  3. A few “new” labels for long since retired classic parts.
  4. To focus on current parts, retired parts have been moved to a separate folder.

Every update include some of the most popular new parts, parts which have continued to grow in popularity over time, and some of the parts requested by Brick Architect readers like you. Thanks for your support!

Learn more and download at brickarchitect.com/labels.

Update to Most Common LEGO Parts

At least once year, I update the Most Common LEGO Parts to see which parts are gaining (and losing) popularity over time. Today’s snapshot is based on all of the sets from 2016-2020 which have been released and inventoried so far…

10 parts that caught my attention

Rank Image Part ID Part Name (# Colors) Notes
1 (+2) 4073 1×1 Plate, Round
(47 colors)
This part has risen to the top spot for the first time that I’ve seen. (I suspect that the new LEGO Art sets pushed it to the top position.)
5 (+10) 98138 1×1 Tile, Round
(49 colors)
A huge jump of 10 positions, also likely caused by LEGO Art series.
36 (+50) 25269 Tile Round 1 x 1 Quarter
(34 colors)
This jump in popularity is certainly caused by the new LEGO Dots series.
111 (+77) 35480 Plate Special 1 x 2 Rounded with 2 Open Studs
(15 colors)
This one is easy to explain—it’s a tremendously useful part!
200 (+112) 32607 Plant, Plate 1 x 1 Round with 3 Leaves
(8 colors)
This 2018 piece has already been used in 178 different sets!
215 (+136) 36840 Bracket 1 x 1 – 1 x 1 Inverted
(9 colors)
The smallest SNOT piece ever created is popular for a good reason.
224 (+363) 49307 Brick Curved 1 x 1 x 2/3 Double Curved Top, No Studs
(12 colors)
This tiny part is incredibly versatile, with 63 sets since it was introduced last year.
362 (+172) 37352 Brick Curved 1 x 2 x 1 No Studs
(16 colors)
Another 2018 piece with explosive popularity growth.
413 (+266) 41682 Tile Special 2 x 2 with 1 x 2 Vertical Plate
(10 colors)
SNOT Elements are often quick to grow in the rankings, like this part which was introduced in 2019 in #10264 Corner Garage.
542 (+806) 37762 Equipment Candle Stick
(4 colors)
This 2018 part’s versatility was revealed in two sets we’ve reviewed at Brick Architect which included 28 pieces each: #21052 Dubai Skyline and #10270 Bookshop.

P.S. I also use the updated list to make sure that LEGO LEGO Brick Labels continues to include labels for all of the most common current parts!

 600 Most Common LEGO Parts  

August LEGO News Roundup

This month, a geeky book for AFOLs was announced, summer sets were finally released in North America, and more…

While my summer break from serious LEGO projects continues, there’s been a lot of LEGO news this month… Let’s take a closer look!

#21054 The White House is finally available in North America.

#21054 The White House is finally available in North America.

Good news! A bunch of sets that were planned for an August 1 release in North America are finally here! Of particular interest to adult fans, this includes #21054 The White House, Harry Potter sets like #75969 Hogwarts Astronomy Tower, and new sets in the City, Creator, Ninjago, and Friends themes. (See what’s new at LEGO or Amazon.)

The Secret Life of LEGO Bricks, by Daniel Konstanski.

The Secret Life of LEGO Bricks, by Daniel Konstanski.

A book by fans, for fans about the history of iconic LEGO elements. I’m excited to read this book by LEGO Fan and Author Daniel Konstanski. You can preorder this premium hardbound book starting at $75 at unbound.com. (It’s a crowdfunding project with a planned release in 2022.)

A serious look at User Experience design for LEGO minifigures. (Photo: designedbycave.co.uk)

A serious look at User Experience design for LEGO minifigures. (Photo: designedbycave.co.uk)

If you love Brick Architect, you will probably love this… The UX of LEGO Interface Panels is an intensely nerdy analysis of User Experience designs through the eyes of a LEGO Minifigure. (This was a real treat for me, since I’m a UX Engineer at Microsoft when I’m not building LEGO.)

#71374 Nintendo Entertainment System (Photo: The LEGO Group)

#71374 Nintendo Entertainment System (Photo: The LEGO Group)

Strong demand for Adult-oriented sets continues… Both #71374 – Nintendo Entertainment System (2646 pieces, $229.99 / 229.99€ / £209.99) and #21323 – LEGO Ideas Grand Piano (3662 pieces, $349.99 / 349.99€ / £319.99) sold out within days of their release, and aren’t even available on backorder. LEGO definitely underestimated demand for these massive new sets!

Design your own LEGO Theme at LEGO World Builder.

In a confusing move by The LEGO Group, they announced LEGO World Builder. It’s kind of like LEGO Ideas, but for a whole new LEGO product theme. Multiple people can contribute to each world, adding a backstory, example sets, minifigures and more.

While they don’t make it obvious on the website, contributors will be compensated if their ideas are adapted into LEGO products. (The compensation rates seem low, with a maximum of $30,000 for someone invents a whole new LEGO Theme from scratch, down to $500 split between all contributors if LEGO produces a single element from your project.)

A few more links to check out:

I hope you’ve enjoyed this news roundup. We’ll be back with more original articles this fall!

July LEGO News Roundup

This month, we learned that LEGO+IKEA=BYGGLEK, new sets for adults were revealed, BrickCon goes virtual, and we discovered another set that got away…

While it’s been a quiet month here at Brick Architect, there’s been a ton of interesting LEGO News that I’m excited to share with you. We’ll be back with new reviews and articles soon!

IKEA + LEGO = BYGGLEK (Photo: stonewars.de)

IKEA + LEGO = BYGGLEK (Photo: stonewars.de)

Last year, The LEGO Group and IKEA announced a partnership to “explore and develop solutions to stimulate play all around the home.” The result is BYGGLEK, a series of three different LEGO-compatible storage products which you will be able to purchase at IKEA stores. They are not available yet, but stonewars.net was able to purchase and review them early. (While I hope to offer a detailed review in the future, I’m not impressed with what I’ve seen so far.)

BrickCon 2020 goes virtual.

BrickCon 2020 goes virtual.

Following on the heels of major LEGO conventions around the world, The BrickCon convention in October is going virtual. Unlike many of the other conventions that have gone virtual (such as Bricks by the Bay and Brickworld Virtual), BrickCon 2020 is trying to re-create as much of the convention experience as possible for AFOL’s, with a full range of “awards, classes, workshops, prizes, vendors and more.”

The BrickCon Private Convention for AFOL’s starts at $25 (Tickets available August 1), or you can attend the Public Expo for a lower price (Tickets available September 1). P.S. No promises, but I will probably give a talk at the Private Convention.

I’m also excited to highlight two sets coming soon that will be of particular interest to Adult Fans of LEGO:

#71374 Nintendo Entertainment System (Photo: The LEGO Group)

#71374 Nintendo Entertainment System (Photo: The LEGO Group)

#71374 – Nintendo Entertainment System will contain 2646 pieces for $229.99 (229.99€ / £209.99). Learn more on YouTube.

#21323 LEGO Ideas Grand Piano (Photo: The LEGO Group)

#21323 LEGO Ideas Grand Piano (Photo: The LEGO Group)

#21323 – LEGO Ideas Grand Piano will contain 3662 pieces for $349.99 (349.99€ / £319.99). Learn more at LEGO.com.

Both of these sets will be released on August 1. (You may be able to pre-order them at LEGO.com soon.)

The last big news is that LEGO has cancelled yet another new LEGO Set before widespread release. #42113 Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey Helicopter was based on a Tiltrotor Vertical Takeoff aircraft designed in partnership between Bell Helicopters and Boeing.

#42113 Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey Helicopter (Photo: The LEGO Group)

#42113 Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey Helicopter (Photo: The LEGO Group)

The set depicts the Helicopter in a domestic Search and Rescue context, despite the fact that it has only been deployed in military contexts so far. Protests by the German Peace Society contributed to the decision to cancel the product release, which was scheduled for August 1. (As with #21038 Las Vegas Skyline, it looks like a few copies of the set were sold before this decision was made.)

I hope you’ve enjoyed this news roundup. Stay tuned for new articles and reviews soon!

New LEGO Mindstorms; New Labels for Hubs, Motors, and Sensors.

After 7 years, LEGO is finally releasing an updated MINDSTORMS set which uses the new “Powered Up” standard. I’ve celebrated by releasing a beta version of LEGO Brick Labels for these next-generation electronics.

#51515 LEGO MINDSTORMS Robot Inventor was announced today, replacing the 7-year old #31313 LEGO Mindstorms EV3 set for consumers. (The new set uses many of the same components as the recently released #45678 LEGO Education SPIKE Prime Set.)

#51515 LEGO MINDSTORMS Robot Inventor (Coming soon)

#51515 LEGO MINDSTORMS Robot Inventor (Coming soon)

#51515 LEGO MINDSTORMS Robot Inventor — $359.99 (359.99€ / £329.99), 949 pieces, ages 10+. (Available early in Q4 2020)

Beta version of LEGO Brick Labels for Powered Up components.

Beta version of LEGO Brick Labels for Powered Up components.

I’m most excited because this means that almost all LEGO Electronics components have finally moved away from proprietary connectors, in favor of the new Powered Up interface. To celebrate this milestone, I’ve released a “beta” version of new labels for all of the current Powered Up components.

Download and learn more on a new page that explains the Powered Up system.

Will you be adding the new Powered-up compatible MINDSTORMS set to your collection this fall?